Germans were murdered indiscriminately without regard to age, profession, social position, religion, or sex: no class was spared from torture, whether farmer or property owner, teacher, priest, doctor, merchant, worker or factory owner. The victims were not shot by firing squad: the butchery was never based on any title of law. The victims were shot, beaten to death, stabbed, tortured to death, without reason; the majority, in addition, were mutilated in an animal-like manner. These were deliberate murders, committed mostly by Polish soldiers, policemen or gendarmes, as well as by armed citizens, classical secondary school students, and apprentices. Uniformed insurgents, members of the "Westverband", riflemen, railroad workers, released criminals, even housewives, all joined in the blood frenzy. Everywhere, a definite method was followed, leading naturally to the inference of a centrally planned, uniform programme of murder. The open, and even admitted, aim of Polish policy was the extinction of Germanness. Literature, among other things, was an instrument of this policy, as a means to which hatred was deliberately fomented.
- Else Löser, The Image of the Germans in Polish Literature